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Glaciers

themedvirtualtour

In this tour you can see glaciers in different parts of Iceland, Snæfellsjökull (Snæfellsnes peninsula), Eyjafjallajökull (South Coast), Sólheimajökull (South Coast),  Skaftafellsjökull (South Coast), Svínafellsjökull (South Coast) and Fjallsárlón (South Coast)

Glaciers are one of the most mysterious natural wonders in the world. Some are even big enough to be visible from space! 11% of Icelands total land area is covered by glaciers, which can be found all over the island. The glaciers differ in both size and appearance and they can be found in all parts of the country. The distribution of glaciers on Iceland reflects topography, temperatures and precipitation. Glaciers form where mean annual temperatures are below 0°C, and where winter precipitation in the form of snow surpasses summer melt. Mean annual temperatures in the coastal areas around Iceland lie everywhere well above 0°C, but are generally below that in areas above 600-700 m a.s.l. This means that glaciers are located in highlands and mountainous areas, with high precipitation. Icelandic glaciers are presently retreating – Glaciers on Iceland had their maximum Little Ice Age extension by 1890-1920. Glacier variations in Iceland since 1930 show a clear response to variations in climate during this period.